Oh, Arsenal. Just when it seems like things might be going okay.

Reached a cup final; had a good transfer window that seen the club bring in Henrikh Mkhitaryan and it looks like Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang as well; potentially the Ozil situation may be sorted; a couple of bad results for the surrounding teams in the league; a convincing win against Crystal Palace in the last game; the atmosphere at the club seemed to be improving... and just like that, they manage to bring supporters back down to earth with an astoundingly an inept loss to the side at the foot of the Premier League table.

Just about everything that could go wrong for Arsenal, did go wrong at the Liberty Stadium. That mightn't have seemed the case in the 33rd minute when a Nacho Monreal goal gave the Gunners the lead, but it certainly did within a minute later when Sam Clucas equalized matters.

In the second half, Jordan Ayew compounded the misery of Arsenal supporters who had made their way to Wales when he took advantage of a defenisve disaster to make it 2-1. Finally, it was Clucas again, a much maligned figure at Swansea only a few weeks ago, that put the final nail in Arsenal's coffin in the 86th minute following another slip-up at the back amongst the defense and Petr Cech in the Arsenal goals.

These mistakes were a huge problem, and it was evident for all to see, with Wenger remarking frankly immediately following the match that his side's loss was down to "unusual and massive mistakes".

That's not to take it away from Swansea, who started the game at the bottom of the table, but whose recent form - beating Liverpool 1-0 in their previous match - suggests that they may not be there for long. New manager Carlos Carvalhal has reinvigorated the club following on from taking over from Paul Clement, and despite it looking like a sinking ship at the time (the side who had only manged 15 goals prior to last night's match), Swansea look like a side that will make a full-fledged claim for League safety under the Portugese manager. What's even more impressive is that he has not added a single player during his tenure, making the last month's results even more respectable, so credit where it is due.

Arsenal on the other hand were bereft of creativity and even after going behind did not look like they would make their way back into the match. The "mistakes" that Wenger spoke of were significant and Swansea took advantage of them.

Petr Cech has taken a lot of the criticism for these mistakes, all though his defense certainly aren't free of blame. The first goal, which came immediately after Monreal's opener, was a poor one to concede regardless of circumstance.

Ozil was guilty of giving the ball away to easily, which was picked up upon by Martin Olsson in his own half, who played the ball to hero of their previous game, Alfie Mawson. Clucas made a threatening run - that was not tracked at all by Granit Xhaka - and found a pass from Mawson, and made no mistake as he easily sidestepped Laurent Koscielny with a touch and steered a left-footed effort by Cech. 1-1.

The second for the Swans, Ayew's goal, was a defensive shambles - Monreal, who has impressed of late, elected not to keep the ball in play, much to Wenger’s disdain, and Shkodran Mustafi, under pressure from an onrushing Nathan Dyer, passed back to Cech from the throw-in that followed. On a drenched field the Arsenal goalkeeper sliced his intended clearance horribly and Ayew had the simple task of rolling the ball into the unguarded net from no more than eight yards for his seventh goal of the season. Shocking.

Making the result look deserving poor was Clucas with his second, which gave Swansea a deserved two-goal cushion. His forward running threatened throughout the game, and he earned his brace on the night, as he deftly made his way in-front of the arsenal back line before converting on his near post.

Mkhitaryan got his opportunity to don an Arsenal shirt for the first time, but was unable to make a difference (despite looking good, to be fair to him).

It's beginning to look like Arsene Wenger should be considering looking at Manchester United's access route to European football from last season and focus efforts on Europa league success, with the tournament returning this week.

If there was one bittersweet moment to the game, it was the appearance of Olivier Giroud as a substitute in the dying embers of the game. The striker who had been out injured for the past few weeks, took to the field in what seems likely to be his last game for Arsenal, with a move to Chelsea expected to be confirmed today. Wenger praised the Frenchman, who since signing for the club in 2013 has scored over 100 goals, saying: “It’s a tribute to Olivier because he’s a guy who gave great service to the club, never let us down on the commitment front and saved us many times.”

Arsenal's next two games represent a huge challenge for the club, with Sam Allardyce's Everton up next at the Emirates this Saturday followed by the second North London derby of the season against Tottenham on the 10th of January. After League losses to Bournemouth and now Swansea in recent weeks, it will be interesting to see how the new additions assimilate themselves and hope to make amends for the errors and embarrassments of the first half of the season's form.

Having the final word on this game, it is clear that changes are needed. The league is beginning to look more and more like a missed opportunity with each passing week, so if there is to be any case to negate this, the next matches are vital. And hopefully Aubameyang wasn't watching too closely last night, as it was the kind-of performance that may change his mind upon pledging his future to playing at the Emirates.